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Structured Authoring for Beginners

Are you new to structured authoring and topic-based writing? Are you more comfortable with unstructured desktop publishing applications and apprehensive about moving to XML or some other structured authoring environment? This workshop is for you if you want to know the how, why, and what it is about structured authoring…

Topic Based Writing: Future-Proofing Your Content?

This is what we’ll cover: Topic-Based writing: the basics The nature of a topic Topic morphology: title, short description (optionally) and content The importance of conceptual consistency Topic-Based writing: content creation and management Standing alone versus story telling A theory of content architecture? Relationship to DITA and structured writing Governance…

From Clashing to Collaboration

14% of knowledge workers felt like striking a coworker in the past year but didn’t. If you are a technical writer, chances are that you were a potential target. Collaborative authoring comes at a price. It is also at odds with 87% of employees worldwide that are not engaged at…

Who Are You? (I Really Wanna Know)

“Who is the audience for this project?” runs the risk of a smarty-pants response (“the user”). For a smart answer, take time to define and understand who is reading and using the information you develop. In this TC Dojo session, we’ll talk about audience analysis: what it is, ways to…

Writing (Non-Agile) Business Requirements

Writing requirements requires the ability to write clearly, concisely, and succinctly so others can design, develop, and test the product. This session covers 8 characteristics of writing a good requirement, reviews 4 steps to requirements gathering, and concludes with 17 tips for writing good requirements. Come and learn how to…

Minimalist Writing for Maximum Communication

The information age is also the age of the short attention span. We typically write for people who must spend much of each day reading. Many readers would prefer a pill that puts the information in their brain. We can’t give them that—but we can strive to give them the…